Cavallotto (Castiglione Falletto)

We have long admired Cavallotto’s Barolos. They are the epitome of elegance, power and poise. If you start your journey into Barolo with Cavallotto, you would be forgiven for finding them a bit stern and ungiving. But just wait. Come at them with respect, with context and they will reveal their refined beauty, their precision and glimpses of perfection.
There was a moment when, having admired them from afar for long enough, we had to make the call. After an unhurried and complete tasting with Giuseppe Cavallotto, it was inevitable their wines would find their way onto our shelves. We have been back again to visit the camera-shy Giuseppe and to marvel at the consistency and quality of their wines, year-in year-out.
The Cavallotto history is a useful example of how the region evolved, albeit much earlier than most. In common with every other grower of the era, the family sold all of their production (apart from what they used themselves) to the big local merchants and Cantina Sociale (the townships’ Co-ops).
In 1944 they took the bold step to vinify and bottle their entire output themselves. So in 1948, when the wine was released, their label was born. Many other growers followed their example in later decades. There was a big move towards self-bottling in the 1970s, 80s and 90s as Barolo became increasingly sought-after and valued.
San Giuseppe is a 3.78 ha parcel within their monopole Bricco Boschis vineyard with vines planted between 1932 and 1956. They have made a Barolo Riserva from these vines in the good vintages since 1970.